Blew It Up

A picture of a balloon seller at a carnival
This week’s photo prompt is provided by pixabay.com

The balloon seller, walked down his usual paths, selling his wares, in his usual way:

Get these balloons for all the good children
And not for those, who break stuff and away run.
Come ye. Come all. Get these balloons from me
and gift it to your boys and girls who have a good story

And his usual way, unfortunately for the parents, was alongside schools and parks. On hearing his song, children would look at their parents for a judgement of behaviour. And in order to pacify them, the fathers and mothers would buy balloons for their children.

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Selfi(e)sh

a group of boys posing together
Our prompt photo for this week is graciously loaned to us by Ellespeth’s friend. Thank you!

Click

Snap

Whirr

The boys were having fun on their annual school trip. This time it was to the beach and the gang were having fun with the selfies. One of them had a brainwave.

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Day 11: Memory Lane

Today’s Prompt: Where did you live when you were 12 years old?

Today’s twist: pay attention to your sentence lengths and use short, medium, and long sentences


I have had Photoshop lessons. And that introduced me to a feature called content-aware. This post seems to be a full-blown account of writing with awareness about the content and this is what goes through my mind when I read this. And I have a personal twirl on Today’s Prompt. An experience that I had when I was a 12-year-old nerdy kid. It was a competition for which I had been chosen to participate in. It was a national level competition and I had to travel to New Delhi (close to 2500KM or 1550 miles). The qualifying round was actually simple. The round involved a multiple choice question answer quiz about computers and such. The unexpected was getting selected. There were brainier kids in my class, not to count for the brainier classes nearby.

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Day Ten: Happy Times

Today’s Prompt: Tell us something about your favourite childhood meal.

Today’s twist: Tell the story in your own distinct voice.


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Nostalgic Nuggets: Down the Memory Lane

I am leaving my school, where others can find
Memories of mine, which I leave behind.

I first came here at the age of three
An age when everyone is careless and free.

As my childhood days slowly flew,
My standard of studying also grew.

My friends and I had regular Monday morning blues,
We are now remorseful for wanting to avoid school.

Laughter caused by the jokes we cracked,
Class tests in which marks we lacked,
The playgrounds with cricket bats,
And stage plays in which we got to act,
Have all become completely abstract.

I used to think that the strict teachers were really bears,
But now I realise that they were the ones who really cared.

We used to run out at the stroke of the bell,
Running out thinking that we were escaping hell.

But now that all of us have become alumni,
We don’t have the heart to say goodbye.

They say that school is one’s second home,
It is with that thought that I finish my poem.

Post#1: Yearn To Learn. Not Learn To Earn.

Today, the world runs on money. It’s a language that anyone can understand as long as you can translate convert it. Today, it’s money that maketh the human. The way to money seems quite established – either inherit it or earn it. There are other ways, but that’s not the road we’re taking in this post today.

If you’re not already born with a silver spoon, you probably have to earn it for yourself. Education is often established as an assured way to ensure that you get a paying job. Some others root for learning by doing as well. They argue that

…do we really learn what we need out of life from school?

stuff we don't learn, but need to
Just search for “mitochondria is the powerhouse of the cell meme” and indulge in the humour

We have seen several memes flooding the internet on how we have learned nothing with regard to real-life but we do know that mitochondria are the powerhouse of the cell. While this is an exaggeration – there are classes in school that cover what we face in life – we also should agree that it’s not inclusive of everything one would need to function. On the other hand, parents/guardians take to focussing on answering the “what next?” question for the child – expect them to get a professional degree.

So what is a professional degree?
Well, in a sentence, it is best described as THE COURSE which absolutely, unconditionally, and unquestionably lands you in a job that’s looked up in the society and keeps your bank account healthy, wealthy and wise.

While studying for a job might seem like the solution to the problem – you end up gaining skills that are going to help your real career – it might not be the right solution in the longer term. With so many bright people running the race to get to the finish line of “I-have-joined-the-best-course-in-the-best-college”, you might wonder how everyone will land in a dream job. Well, they don’t. We also have a large number of people graduating out of colleges – which causes the next set of problems

  • Should people only get hired for a job that they studied for? As in, would you want to base the rest of your life off what you should have learnt in a few years?
  • Are there enough vacant jobs in the field that you want – that want someone with your skills and experience?
  • Would you rather stay unemployed than get a job that isn’t up to your degree?

There are of course a handful who may be able to get through to what they want to. Students with varied interests might end up in courses that divert them from what they actually like doing. This gives rise to two groups:

  • Students who end up learning their lessons just to earn a degree and a job.
  • Students who love their area of study, and yearn to learn.

Those who are going to learn to earn, and those who are going to yearn to learn. Well, this is a problem all right. The solution sounds simple – let people study what they want to instead of forcing one’s dreams onto one’s children. Or even if you’re not and are giving your inputs about what to study/do next based on your good intentions, provide it as a choice and not an ultimatum. Hopefully, given time, we’ll have passionate people pursuing what they love, who become passionate professionals who are proud of what they do.


This post was written years ago when I had just walked out of school and jumped through many hoops before getting to college. Some or most of my points in my earlier posts, such as this, do feel cringeworthy. If you feel that some content should be rewritten/removed, please do let me know.